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String Rose PATTERN

Well, d-day has almost arrived. Tomorrow I head back to school. Where did the summer go? At least the class schedule is looking pretty light and I'll only be at school for 2- 2 1/2 days a week.

Today I want to share a really simple technique/pattern I've called "String Rose". This idea first made an appearance on the blog during the old into new challenge back in 2014. I named one of the experimentation tiles as Trentwith and though this pattern was the initial source of inspiration, my version takes a different approach. I had always meant to share the technique as it's so simple, and fun, but I just didn't get around to it. Until now! 2 1/2 years later.....haha.

O.k., here goes........

The String Rose Pattern - this shows the base technique.


As it's all done in one continuous line, I thought a little insta-video might help out:


A video posted by A Little Lime (@alittlelime) on

I've never linked my Instagram video before so I hope it works - not sure whether it will show up via email, so if not, just visit the website, or my instagram feed.

Why not try String Rose out on different grids? Shown here on a s-grid (alternating) and a diamond grid. The s-grid is my favourite. Adds to the organic feel, I think.


You don't need to be locked into a grid to draw this. Freehand some random sized roses, add a few leaves. Ta da. Bouquet!


Have a great day!
hx

Comments

  1. Thank you for sharing this Helen, your work has been an inspiration for me for quite a few years now. I love the flow you get - so incredibly pretty - thanks again! Yvonne

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    1. Thank you, Yvonne! I hope you have a chance to try this one - so easy which (for me) makes it a lot of fun to play with - I don't have to think too hard about what I'm doing :) h

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  2. Lovely. This makes a wonderful pattern. I will definitely play with this one. Great success in the upcoming school term!

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    1. Thanks, Pat :) I hope you have fun playing around with this one - I am a bit addicted at the moment, scraps of paper with string roses everywhere!! I think this semester will be a bit of a slog for me, but one day at a time and it'll soon be done :) Thank you! h

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  3. Helen, you are such an astute observer of nature, your 'string rose' actually does look like a rose. Mine, however, looks more like some kind of Dorothy-esque Kansas tornado! Thank you for sharing your talent and inspiration. I'm sure you'll enjoy being back in school!

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    1. Thank you! They remind me a bit of ribbon roses. I hope you persist with them as they are easy once you've done a few, and, I think, a lot of fun :) I've got pages of them strewn all over my desk at the moment! h

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  4. So simple but looks so stunning. Love the shading on the last example. Have fun in school.

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    1. Thank you, Donald :) They're lots of fun - I hope you have a chance to give them a go :) h

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  5. When I looked at the images my first impression was, OK - no problem. Then I watched the video...Ouch, never ever will I be able to draw your string rose in just ONE STRING, but now I know why it's called 'string rose'. (Practice, Susie, practice, practice!!!). Thanks Helen, for this challenging but so beautiful 'string'.

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  6. This is a beautiful pattern and I will definitely try it and the video will help a lot. Looks as it will help if your rock a bit from side to side :) Love your work!

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    1. Thanks, Susan :) Just aim to draw the next "loop" in a different direction from the previous one and you should do great! h

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  7. Thank you. This is lovely!
    Good luck with school!

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  8. Helen! I love it! Very Charles Rene Macintosh-esque.

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    1. Also, a question...I'm not sure what you meant by "alternating S-grid." Did you change the direction in which you drew the spiral with each rose?

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    2. Hi Judy. Thank you :) An alternating s-grid is my name for a grid that is formed with vertical lines of continuous s-strokes. Alternate lines are done in the opposite direction to form the grid. I hope that makes sense? (If you check out my patterns page and look at "Leaflet" - it is this grid without the straight lines). h

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  9. Oh WOW Helen, what a wonderful pattern. After a much-too-long hiatus from drawing, I've started drawing on some river rocks again. Reckon I'll have to discover how your String Rose will work there. Thanks, as always, for your INSPIRATION and, of course, beautiful patterns and drawings.

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  10. Love this pattern. It will take a bit of practice. Thanks for sharing. As always, I'm a big fan of your work.

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  11. Very pretty. I love all of your flower tangles!
    Barb B. CZT

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  12. Beautiful! Very elegant and seems so easy! I love your work. It is always an inspiration for me 😊

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  13. How simple. Yet very effective. Thank you

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  15. Helen, you create such beauty with your "simple" drawings! String Rose is an easy, rocking, continuous line yet when complete - and especially when shaded - the effect is SO lovely! Thank you for the video - very helpful. Your grid examples and your shaded bouquet are absolutely gorgeous. I'm off to try your technique this very moment!! :)

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  16. This one enchanted me right away. Mine don't look as balanced as yours, but they still turn out looking so interesting. I'll play with this a lot, I'm sure!

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  17. Helen! This is beauuuutiful and the Instagram Video link worked wonderfully-->THANK YOU for sharing sooo much with us! Good Luck as you go back to school (heading that way myself after decades of being out!).

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  18. Totallt amazing and looks easy,,,cant wait to try iy,,,lol

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